Cocktails with… Redsmith Gin

One of the really exciting things that has been going on in the UK recently is the return of distilleries to some of those cities in Britain that have not had a new distillery for a century or two. Examples include Bath, Bristol, Edinburgh, Leeds, Manchester, and Sheffield; all now (or soon will) boast their own distilleries.

Redmith Gin FINAL

Another example is Nottingham, which has also got its own new distillery: Redsmith Distillery in Ruddington, just 5 miles south of the city.

Bottled at 43.0% ABV, the gin is made using a mix of 9 botanicals, including: juniper, coriander, and orange.

On its own
Nose: Bright citrus with some green, leafy herbal notes, plus pine blossom mixed with lavender.
Taste: This has an excellent, luxurious texture with a little sweet spice upfront. Savoury, leafy salad notes are followed by a crescendo of citrus and juniper, along with a long, aromatic finish of pine and just a touch of black pepper.

Gin & Tonic
Wow! Sparklingly bright and invigorating; lovely citrus notes come through, as well as more subtle leafy notes, all before a classic, dry finish.

Martini
Crunchy, leafy notes upfront make this a refreshing cocktail. They are accompanied by floral spiced notes. It is clean and refreshing, with a lovely brightness to it. An excellent pre-dinner cocktail.

Negroni
Another excellent drink: bold, intense, and juicy. The gin comes through well and works well with the drink’s strong, bitter finish. This has great balance – a true classic.

The Sheriff
A variation on the Peter Cushing, this cocktail is a nod to the actor playing the Sheriff of Nottingham in the 1960 film, The Sword of Sherwood Forest.
[50ml Redsmith Gin, 25ml Stone’s Ginger Wine, 5 dashes of Orange Bitters – SHAKE]
Sublime! The bitters and the bright citrus of the gin work superbly well together with some light floral notes that intermingle with the sweet ginger. Spicy and zesty – excellent refreshment.

In Conclusion
Redsmith is a bright and bouncy gin, full of life and delicious, complex flavours, including a mix of citrus and fresh greens. Many a fine drink will be supped with this this summer. My favourites of those that I tried were the Gin Tonic and The Sheriff.

Redsmith Website

Redsmith Twitter – @redsmithdistill

Redsmith Facebook

Cocktails with… Sipsmith House of Commons Gin

The Visitors Centre in the House of Commons has a plethora of gifts available for purchase, from tea towels to jigsaws, postcards to teddy bears. They also sell booze: a variety of spirits, wine, and beer. Recently, Sipsmith were awarded the contract to provide the “House of Commons” Gin. Excitingly, this is bottled at 40.7% ABV, which is lower than their standard 41.6% ABV. This lower ABV results in a different flavour.

House of Commons Sipsmith Gin FINAL

On its own
Nose: Citrus and vanilla, with a great selection of rich, plummy fruit notes and pine jelly.
Taste: Exceptionally smooth palate, with notes of spicy coriander upfront, as well as some earthy floral notes, before creamy citrus and a long, dry finish with just a hint of black pepper. Overall, this is a complex, smooth, and very accessible spirit.

Gin & Tonic
A sparkly nose with a little spice and pepper, with citrus and angelica. This is a luscious Gin & Tonic: delicate, fresh, smooth, succulent, and oh so refreshing, with a fine lemon flavour running throughout. Light and everything you could want from a Gin & Tonic.

Martini
A smooth and full-textured drink with a hint of sweetness and citrus, before a clean, crisp, and dry finish. Easy to drink, but with a powerful character.

Negroni
A well-integrated, mellow, and soft Negroni. Accessible, even to those who are not usually Negroni fans. There is a very crisp, gently sharp note of juniper, before light spice and the signature herbal bitterness of the cocktail come into play.

In Conclusion
Th gin worked well in all drinks providing a more mellow gin flavour to the other higher ABV Sipsmiths. An excellent gin for lunchtime or the afternoon. My favourite drink was the gin tonic.

Sipsmith House of Commons Gin (Available exclusively from the Jubilee Gift Shop (the one inside Parliament) £28 for 70cl, 40.7% ABV)

Cocktails with… Anno Dry Gin

Anno Gin is made by Anno Distillery in Kent. The name “Anno” comes from the first two letters of the founders’ first names: Andy and Norman.

The gin, which is bottled at 43.0% ABV, is produced in a copper pot still and is made using botanicals that include: Juniper, Coriander, Angelica, Orris, Liquorice, Cassia, Cubeb Berries, Lemon, Bitter Orange, and Tahitian Lime Leaves.

There are also a selection of locally-sourced botanicals that capture the terroir of the distillery’s region:
Kentish Hops
Lavender
Elderflower
Rosehips
Camomile
Samphire

Anno also make a Sloe Gin, a Cranberry Gin, and an Elderflower Vodka, but it is their dry gin that I am tasting today.

Anno Gin FINAL

Neat (at room temperature)
Appearance: Clear, bright, clean and sediment-free.
Nose: Crisp, piney juniper, angelica, and citrus. There is also a touch of florality, some leafy, herbal notes, and the faintest hint of dark chocolate. Complex and inviting.
Taste: Soft to start, with a rich, full texture and a complexity of flavour that grows as you sip. The palate starts with classic juniper, before moving towards some citrus and then some sweet spiced notes and a hint of dark cocoa.
Finish: Bold and long, with leafy herbal notes, as well as the noticeable, but not overpowering, Kentish Hops. Balanced, with a crisp, dry lift at the very end.

Overall, this is a Classic style of gin with a Kentish twist.

Neat (from the freezer)
Floral citrus really comes through on the nose, as well as a hint of celery. It has a lovely thick and viscous texture – delightful; the low temperature really brings out the unique characteristics of the gin such as floral notes and the leafy hops. Whilst still dry and full of juniper, this serving gives the gin a more contemporary edge.

Gin & Tonic
Classic, clean and crisp. It is dry to start, with a zesty citrus middle and a long, dry finish. Very refreshing with subtle spice and herbal notes giving it a distinguished quality.

In Conclusion
Anno Gin is a great example of how distillers can capture the character of their surroundings in a gin whilst still keeping that recognisable dry gin flavour. I especially enjoyed sipping it from the freezer.

Cocktails with… Pierde Almas +9 Botanical Gin

Yesterday I had the great pleasure to hear Jonathan Barbieri from Pierde Almas Mezcal discuss the finer points of his Mezcal range at an excellent tutored tasting at Amathus, Soho. Whilst the Mezcals were fascinating and delicious it was the last product of the day that caught my attention.

Pierde Almas +9 Botanical Mezcal (Gin) has caused some discussion between myself and my good friend of http://www.theGinIsIn.com (America’s Gin Reviewer) as to whether a product that doesn’t call itself gin be a gin, does the inclusion of juniper in any botanical spirit automatically make it gin?

Pierde Almas Mezcal +9 Botanicals Gin

The question was resolved when I asked the distiller himself, who answered that it was a gin but that US regulation state that a product can only be classified in one drinks category thus a spirit cannot be a gin-mezcal or mezcal-gin.

The Pierde Almas Gin uses a double distillation of Espadin as a base, nine classic botanicals are then steeped in the spirit for 24 hours before distillation. Some botanicals are also suspended above the spirit in a mesh bag; “like a big tea-bag, but made from a hair net” in the top of the still (gin head) forming a rudimentary version of vapour infusion.

The nine botanicals are:

Juniper
Coriander
Angelica
Orange
Orris
Cassia
Star Anise
Fennel
Nutmeg

The gin is bottled at 45.0% ABV and uses a slow distillation that results in a daily production of around 20 litres.

The Taste

Own
nose: smoke and citrus, with some savoury elements reminiscent of roasted peppers. As it opens up piney juniper and fennel come forward as well as a little sweet jammy citrus.

taste: A very smooth spirits, characteristic of the Pierde Almas Mezcals, the flavours of the Espadin comes through to start with a hint of vanilla. There is then unmistakable juniper in the middle; rich piney with a hint of resin. This is followed by some sweeter notes from the herbs such as the anise and fennel and there is a long dry finish with a little angelica, fennel and the residual character of the spirit base. It would be all to easy for the mezcal flavours to take over but, for me, there is a sense of harmony between the base and the botanicals.

Gin & Tonic
A very unusual gin and tonic very smoky but with bright and fresh botanical flavours. The choice of tonic would be important here and for best results I think perhaps embracing the herbal nature of something like Fevertree Mediterranean or 1724 would be worthwhile. In addition I think the extra attention given when mixing a fine Gin Tonica with the aroma and flavours that goes with that serve and its thoughtful garnishes would be worth the extra effort. This is not a typical Gin & Tonic and may not appeal to the ardent traditionalist, however I think it is smashing.

Pierde Almas Jonathan and DTS

Martini
Delightful the chilled down gin is softened and allows some of the more delicate sweet spice notes to come through such a creamy vanilla, which works well with the dry vermouth. There is a little saltiness and a touch of smoke. This is a drink that will appeal to traditionalists and newbies alike.

Negroni
Fantastic nose smoky agave and wider mezcal notes mixed with juniper, fennel and anise. A rich and smooth Negroni will a charming interplay between the smoky mezcal notes and the bitterness of the Campari. However, the gin notes of the drink are not simply defined by the gin’s base and there is certainly plenty of the juicy citrus along with angelica and the botanicals noted on the nose. I’ve never had anything like it, simply delightful and a new favourite.

Cocktails with Bummer & Lazarus Dry Gin

I recently reviewed the British Chilgrove Gin which was the first in the UK to be distilled using Grape Neutral Spirit so it was great to try a comparative product from California.

Bummer & Lazarus Dry Gin is distilled at the Raff Distillerie on Treasure Island, San Francisco, California. they also make an Absinthe (also base of grape spirit), and are working on a Rum Agricole and a Bourbon.

http://www.raffdistillerie.com/gin.html

Bummer & Lazarus Dry Gin – http://www.raffdistillerie.com/gin.html

The gin is named after two dogs that roamed the streets of San Francisco in the mid 19th century. The grape neutral spirit is sourced from 100% Californian grapes and this is then re-distilled with a selection of botanicals including:

Juniper
Coriander
Angelica
Lemon
Orange
Orris
Cinnamon
Liquorice

The Taste

Own
nose: very very fruity; the base spirit is quite evident on the nose with orange and some broader chocolate notes as well as fennel and a touch of dry juniper.
taste: a very smooth texture, as you may expect from a grape spirit base. There is a rich plump fruitiness with coriander, orange and grapefruit citrus. A touch of coconut and a hint of pine precede a long dry fruity finish with a pleasant warmth.

Gin & Tonic
A very fruity gin and tonic full of plump grapes as well as crisp green apple and pear notes and a little sweetness – the drink is reminiscent of apple jelly or jam. For a garnish I think the crispness of lime contrasts well with the more confectionery elements of the gin.

Martini
As a diamond-method Martini I think this really works, lots of the pear and apple fruity notes come through as well as some sweetness followed by plump, luscious grape flavours. There is bright juniper, coriander, citrus and spice. A very clean and silky Martini with both the flavour and texture of the base spirit coming through.

Negroni
Very fruity with a smooth succulence courtesy of the grape spirit there are hints of pear and almond too, slightly reminiscent of a bakewell tart. After these flavours, the herbal elements of the vermouth become more pronounced followed by the herbal bitterness of the Campari. A full-bodied drink, with bitterness. Overall it is quite well-rounded.

 

Cocktails with Sun Liquor Gins – from Seattle, USA

Hedgetrimmer GIn Title

Seattle is a hotbed of distilling at the moment, with gin-making distilleries scattered throughout. One that was a mere stone’s throw from our hotel was Sun Liquor (another being Copperworks). Sun Liquor has a bar attached to their distillery, where they currently make two gins, a vodka, and two rums.

Today’s focus is on the unusually named Hedgetrimer Gin. Why Hedgetrimer? My understanding is that the flavours of the gin somewhat evoke the scents and flavours of a hedgerow, with its mix of leafy green herbal and rich fruit notes.

The gin is bottled at 42.0% ABV and is made using a mix of 9 botanicals. The base spirit is in-house using unmalted (non-GMO) organic wheat. The spirit is twice distilled in Scottish copper pot stills and, after the initial distillation, the botanicals are rested for 24 hours.

The nine botanicals include:
Juniper
Coriander
Angelica
Fresh lemon peel
Fresh orange peel
Grains of Paradise
Sarsaparilla root
Cannonball watermelons rind

On its own
Nose: Soft pine juniper, a little saltiness and other savoury, herbal notes such as black pepper. Then coriander and fresh citrus.
Taste: Plenty of coriander followed by angelica, pine and citrus. This has a smooth, creamy texture, with warmth towards the end. A pretty classic gin with good balance.

Gin & Tonic
The Hedgetrimer Gin & Tonic is, as you might imagine from the name, piney and zesty. It’s quite a classic style, with a good amount of dryness, but refreshing, too, and the gin stands up well to the tonic. Lemon would be my garnish of choice.

Martini
A smooth Martini, with lots of juniper. This is a really good example of a dry Martini with lots of flavour; after the dry juniper and pine, there is a little citrus and spice.

Negroni
A simple and straightforward Negroni, but one that ticks all of the boxes. Smooth, with a bitter-sweet finish.

GunClub Gin Title

The gin is bottled at 50.0% ABV and is made using a mix of 13 botanicals. The base spirit is made in-house using unmalted (non-GMO) organic wheat. The spirit is twice distilled in Scottish copper pot stills and, after the initial distillation, the botanicals are rested for 48 hours.

Botanicals include:

Juniper Berries
Coriander Seed
Angelica Root
Fresh Orange Peel
Orris Root
Cassia Bark
Birch Leaves
Fresh organic Cranberries

Gun Club Gin Bottle

 

On its own
Nose: A crisp nose of juniper and lime.
Taste: Bold in flavour and with little burn, this has notes of angelica and juniper, followed by sweet spice, such as cassia, and then some floral notes: violet and hibiscus. The dry finish is of coriander and bright and zesty citrus.

Gin & Tonic
Bold flavours, with plenty of spice, especially cassia and cardamom. This is followed by dry, citrus and juniper, plus softer angelica notes. Definitely a punchy, quaffable, and delicious drink!

Martini
Superb – everything I look for in a Martini: powerful and chilling, and a cocktail that that really wakes you up. There’s a symphony of botanical flavours with a good juniper solo, a citrus and herbal chorus, and a finish that lasts, just like a great tune that’s stuck in your head. Excellent.

Negroni
A very solid Negroni, although maybe a little sweeter, spicier, and creamier than many others. There’s a good bitterness on the finish, making this a first-class Negroni with flair.

Cocktails with… Langley No:8 Gin

Langley#8 Gin

The Langley Distillery near Birmingham is a well-respected and established gin producer, making gins for brands such as Broker’s and Martin Miller’s, but, until last year, had no gin whose name reflected its own heritage. That was until Langley No:8, a gin made using a mix of 8 botanicals that is distilled in the copper pot still, Constance. The base spirit is English grain and the gin is bottled at 41.7% ABV.

Langley Gin Bottle

On its own
Nose: A rich, fruity nose with bright citrus and rich herbal notes intermingled with hint of rose.
Taste: Some juniper to start, then coriander and some sweet spice notes – cassia, for instance. This then moves onto a brighter citrus note and a dry, lightly floral finish.

Gin & Tonic
Lots of lemon and even a hint of sherbert make this a refreshing drink, great served with lots of ice and a lemon garnish. Simple, but easy to drink and accessible to all.

Martini
Unusually, I garnished this with pomelo peel, but I think it actually works really well. This is a very classic, very clean Martini that has a good amount of botanical intensity; its flavours work particularly well with the citrus oils from the garnish.

Gentleman’s Martini
[50ml Langley No8, 15ml Dry Vermouth, 5ml Olive Water – STIR]
A rather savoury Martini with the olive flavours really coming through, using olive water rather than brine prevents the drink from being too salty. A clean drink with some good crispness and herbal notes.

Langley Gents Martini

Negroni
A good bitterness upfront, then some sweeter, herbal notes: wormwood and citrus peel, as well as sweeter herbs. There is a long, clean and bitter finish from the Campari, although it is a bright, crisp bitterness, rather than a dark, earthy one. Refreshing. This does work well when garnished with ruby grapefruit.

Langley Station Master
This variation on the Martini is superb, the drinks i made by pouring stirred-down gin into a glass that has been rinsed with Lagavulin 16 (or other smoky whisky). For extra pow! (should you need any) I can recommend pouring the gin straight from the freezer with no dilution at all.

Gimlet
A crisp and vibrant drink: the citrus flavours of the gin work well with the cordial, providing a good balance between sweet and tart. A good alternative to a pre-dinner Martini.