Cocktails with.. Palmer’s Gin 44%ABV

Langley’s Distillery, the distillers behind such hits as Martin Miller’s, Brokers, and Hammer & Son Old Tom Gin, have made Palmer’s Gin on their own account for a number of years, although it has been less well-known than some of these other products. The gin is named after the Palmer Group, the owners of Langley Distillery.  

Palmers44.jpg

2016 sees a relaunch of Palmer’s Gin with a new bottle and an increase in ABV from 40%-44% ABV. It is made using a combination of ten botanicals.

On its own
Nose: Chocolate and lemon, with a touch of earthy pine.
Taste: This is a classic gin with an engaging flavour profile; there is a good interplay between notes of citrus and chocolate, the former being of lemon and orange, making it almost reminiscent of a jaffa cake. After this, dry, more resinous botanicals come through, with a pleasant oiliness and a touch of black pepper.

Gin & Tonic
Excellent – so light and refreshing. Lots of crisp citrus and juniper notes followed by a clean, lightly bitter finish. Delicious.

Martini
A clean crispness makes this another refreshing and light cocktail, but with plenty of character. This would be a great choice for a pre-dinner drink, particularly when dining al fresco.

Negroni
Lively and jammy, with delightful hints of full shred marmalade. The finish is clean, with notes of dry, crisp juniper from the gin and the bitter Campari. Superb!

In Conclusion
Palmer’s Gin is a well-balanced spirit that is a delight to drink. Very classic, but the chocolate-citrus flair sets it apart. My favourite drink was the Martini.

 

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Cocktails with… Langley No:8 Gin

Langley#8 Gin

The Langley Distillery near Birmingham is a well-respected and established gin producer, making gins for brands such as Broker’s and Martin Miller’s, but, until last year, had no gin whose name reflected its own heritage. That was until Langley No:8, a gin made using a mix of 8 botanicals that is distilled in the copper pot still, Constance. The base spirit is English grain and the gin is bottled at 41.7% ABV.

Langley Gin Bottle

On its own
Nose: A rich, fruity nose with bright citrus and rich herbal notes intermingled with hint of rose.
Taste: Some juniper to start, then coriander and some sweet spice notes – cassia, for instance. This then moves onto a brighter citrus note and a dry, lightly floral finish.

Gin & Tonic
Lots of lemon and even a hint of sherbert make this a refreshing drink, great served with lots of ice and a lemon garnish. Simple, but easy to drink and accessible to all.

Martini
Unusually, I garnished this with pomelo peel, but I think it actually works really well. This is a very classic, very clean Martini that has a good amount of botanical intensity; its flavours work particularly well with the citrus oils from the garnish.

Gentleman’s Martini
[50ml Langley No8, 15ml Dry Vermouth, 5ml Olive Water – STIR]
A rather savoury Martini with the olive flavours really coming through, using olive water rather than brine prevents the drink from being too salty. A clean drink with some good crispness and herbal notes.

Langley Gents Martini

Negroni
A good bitterness upfront, then some sweeter, herbal notes: wormwood and citrus peel, as well as sweeter herbs. There is a long, clean and bitter finish from the Campari, although it is a bright, crisp bitterness, rather than a dark, earthy one. Refreshing. This does work well when garnished with ruby grapefruit.

Langley Station Master
This variation on the Martini is superb, the drinks i made by pouring stirred-down gin into a glass that has been rinsed with Lagavulin 16 (or other smoky whisky). For extra pow! (should you need any) I can recommend pouring the gin straight from the freezer with no dilution at all.

Gimlet
A crisp and vibrant drink: the citrus flavours of the gin work well with the cordial, providing a good balance between sweet and tart. A good alternative to a pre-dinner Martini.

Cocktails with.. Hunters Cheshire Gin

HuntersGin

I think that rumours that the gin boom has ended are something of an over-exaggeration. It has yet to “jump the shark”, or so to speak; in fact, as far as I can tell, there have been more gins launched in the first months of 2013 than in any other period that I can recall; definitely during the last five years that I have been following and commentating on the industry, at least.

These new gins come from a mixture of new distilleries and the big three, third-party distillers in the UK: Thames, Greenalls and Langley. It is the last distillery (run by Alcohols Ltd.) that today’s feature gin hails from.

Bottled at 43.3% ABV, Hunters Cheshire Gin was the brainchild of drinks industry veterans Jon Jones and Ian Cass and is made using the London Dry Gin method, although, notably, this term does not make an appearance on the bottle  actually the term is on the back of the bottle. The botanical mix includes: juniper, coriander, orange and lemon.

HuntersGin Bottle

On its own
Nose: Very classic, with plenty of juniper, followed by some angelica and citrus. Bold and sprightly.
Taste: Very smooth, with a little sweetness and some bold flavours: plenty of juniper, angelica and some floral notes such as orris. These are followed by some fruity citrus notes and a long, crisp finish that’s slightly reminiscent of freshly cut apple. Bold and fresh.

Gin & Tonic
Classic and so crisp; lots of fresh and zesty citrus, but still the bold and traditional juniper and angelica flavours, too. This Gin & Tonic is particularly easy to drink and accessible – a drink that will pretty much please anyone. Lovely.

Martini
Greta another classic, works well with the vermouth; coriander and the dry juniper as well as sweet zesty citrus which gives the drink a  lovely crisp edge. A good standard.

Negroni
Hunters makes a classic version of the drink that’s exceptionally smooth, with a good balance between sweet/bitter and dry. The citrus notes of the gin also complement the other notes in the drink nicely. Very good, indeed.

In Conclusion

I’m very impressed with Hunters Gin; I like its bold and crisp flavour, which makes it a little more citrusy then many classic gins, although it is not as far out as, say, the Philadelphian Bluecoat (which I also rather like). This is also a really great Gin & Tonic gin, even with a simple tonic like Schweppes; this was easily my favourite way to enjoy Hunters.

Hunter’s Premium Cheshire Gin is available for around £30 for 70cl from Master of Malt.

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