Hayman’s Gin and Tonic Glasses & Hopped Gin

Readers of Gin Magazine may have seen my recent article appraising a range of different Gin & Tonic glasses, looking at what worked and what could be done better. It was rather serendipitous, therefore, when the results of Hayman’s latest project arrived last week! Today, I’m taking a look at the Hayman’s Gin & Tonic Glass.

Haymans Bumper Tonic Box

A long tall glass, similar to a hi-ball or Collins glass, it has a slight concave in the middle, which makes it easier to hold, and has a solid bottom and a thin lip. The glass is inspired by a 19th Century design found in the family archives.

In my experience, everyone has their favourite type of glass: copa, tumbler, hi-ball; people tend to love one or two and hate others. Personally, I’m quite a fan of all of those previously mentioned, but the Hayman’s glass is the best version of a hi-ball glass that I’ve come across and is simply a delight to drink from.

Not only does it allow the flavour and aromas of the drink to burst forth, it also has a luxurious, “special occasion” feel to it, aided by the elegant decoration, including a subtle “H” so that you know that it’s Hayman’s.

I’ve given this glass to various guests over the past week or so and it’s been a hit with all of them, which reflected my own experience: when I first opened the box, I pretty much didn’t drink out of anything else (except for tea) for 24 hours.

Hayman’s Gin and Tonic Glasses are available for a very reasonable £6 a glass (+p&p) from the Hayman’s Website.

But wait there’s more….

Hayman’s Hopped Gin

A new limited edition gin from Hayman’s, this is a Bartender Release made in collaboration with Jordan Sweeney of the Wigmore Tavern at the Langham Hotel in London. Jordan won the “Hayman’s True Taste Competition 2018” and the prize was a five-day distilling apprenticeship with Master Distiller Christopher Hayman and Distiller Sam Pembridge.

Haymans Hopped Gin

During this time, Jordan created this gin at Hayman’s. It is made using a base botanical mix of the ten classic Hayman’s botanicals, to which he added Golding and Fuggle Hops and Grapefruit Peel. Hops used to be a very popular ingredient in gin and were often used in the fabled Hollands Gin of old.
On its own
Nose: Citrus and chocolate with light hopped notes. Elegant and fragrant.
Taste: An excellent texture: so thick and viscous with a hint of oiliness. Once again, there are notes of chocolate and citrus – in particular grapefruit – then the flavour of fresh, green hops develop, followed by black pepper and resinous juniper.

Gin & Tonic
Soft and citrusy with the occasional whisper of hops that adds a green, leafy complexity and a light bitterness to the drink, all of which pairs well with the tonic. A wedge of ruby grapefruit is an obvious garnish choice here.

Martini
A particularly elegant way to enjoy the gin; it’s almost as if it’s a Martini served in a glass that has had a beer schnapps rinse. It has great body and harks back to the early days of the Martini.

Negroni
A punchy Negroni that’s full of character. The hops really power through the other ingredients, adding intensity and depth to the cocktail’s bitterness. Nonetheless, there is a lovely synergy and balance between the ingredients. Definitely a Negroni for the hard core fans.

Salty Dog
A great, but simple combination. The ruby grapefruit really brings out the floral hoppy notes in the gin, creating a refreshing drink with a gentle kick. Just superb.

Hayman’s Hopped Gin is available from the Hayman’s Website priced at around £39 for a 70cl bottle.

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Cocktails with… Hayman’s Gin

Hayman’s London Dry Gin was created by Christopher Hayman, the great grandson of James Burrough, founder of The Hayman’s Distillers and creator of Beefeater Gin. Hayman’s London Dry Gin was designed as a classic London Dry Gin and was created by Christopher Hayman as an expression of his ultimate London Dry Gin. Its botanicals include: Juniper, Angelica, Coriander, Liquorice, Orris Root and Orange & Lemon Peel; seasoned Gin drinkers may note that these are all the hallmarks of a classic London Dry Gin.

A bottle of Hayman's London Dry Gin

#1 Neat:

With a short juniper nose, this a very simple, classic gin. It is not overburdened with any showiness, with flavours of juniper and citrus and a warming finish.

#2 Gin & Tonic:

Hayman’s makes a classic gin and tonic: there are crisp juniper notes with a little citrus and a touch of bitterness. Quite refreshing.

#3 Martini:

This was a clean Martini and has some warmth behind it. Strong juniper notes come through, along with a little oiliness. This as not as crisp as Martinis made with some other gins, but it still has the classic characteristics.

#4 Gimlet:

A smoother Gimlet than most, this drink is better with a touch less Rose’s Cordial than usual. The drink is tangy and crisp, with enjoyable sour notes at the end.

#5 John Collins:

Hayman’s makes one of the best John Collins I have ever had; it was tangy and zesty; full of life and flavour. It was exceptionally refreshing (Mrs. B said it was revitalising, but I’m not sure you could put that on the bottle!). This drink, with faint hints of lemon sherbet, was really very good and quickly finished.

#6 White Lady:

A lovely White Lady; mellow and well-rounded with the bright citrus of a good lemon sorbet.

#7 Aviation:

A crisp drink, with each ingredient clearly defined. There are sharp juniper flavours in the drink: it’s a beverage that makes you pay attention, which makes it more than just another Aviation.

#8 Bramble:

The juniper balances out the sugar in this Bramble, making it less sweet and more tart than others. Readers who usually find the Bramble too sweet, this is for you.

#9 Gin Sour:

Tart, with an unexpected creamy finish (no, I hadn’t just left some milk in the shaker) and a strong juniper finish. Different to most Gin Sours that I’ve tried, but certainly worth a try.

#10 Clover Club:

Great. This drink allows the flavour of my home-made Grenadine to come through. It is reminiscent of ice-cream, with its silky texture and smooth blend of flavours.

#11 Dubonet:

In my experience, these can sometimes destroy a Gin’s flavours, but Hayman’s stands up better than most, with the juniper balancing out the fortified wine’s bitterness. There’s a nice hint of citrus, too.

#12 Milano:

Amongst all of the cocktails that I tried, this was one of the few disappointments: the Gin seemed to be lost amongst the Galliano (this is not always the case) and so it didn’t showcase the it very well.

#13 Pendennis:

Hayman’s produced a very different Pendennis cocktail to those that we have had with other Gins. A jammy apricot flavour, similar to that of an apricot jam tart (my favourite flavour) appears about halfway through the drink. The full flavour of the Gin comes through and Mrs. B said it tasted strongly of “Pink” (whatever that means?).

#14 Alexander:

This cocktail had an intriguingly fruity smell; it started with hints of cream and chocolate, moving to warmth and a fuller appreciation of the Gin. The flavours blend together well, so that the battle for dominance between gin and cacao, which is characteristic of the Alexander, is notably absent.

#15 Singapore Sling:

I always enjoy a Singapore Sling, and this was certainly no exception. This cocktail takes a little more effort to make, but it’s worth it. Hayman’s Gin seemed to go well with pineapple juice, with its slight bitter edge balancing out the sweetness of the fruit.

#16 Income Tax Cocktail:

This was a smooth cocktail, with only a little juniper coming through. It rather masks the gin, however, and so is not the best cocktail to enjoy Hayman’s Gin in.

#17 Hot Gin Cocktail: HOT

Mrs B. has a newfound fondness for Toddy drinks; so much so, that I only got a sip to check that it was OK before handing it over. These thoughts are hers: yummy! This is the epitome of a hot toddy: the warmth of the drink starts it off and this effortlessly flows into the warmth of the alcohol at the end. It is incredibly comforting, and definitely my favourite of the cocktails we tried.

#18 Bakewell: HOT

This smells like a Bakewell tart, with an almondy milk taste and a little juniper on the finish. The Gin doesn’t interfere, but complements the other flavours. The cherry completes the drink.

All-in-all Hayman’s really is a classic London Dry Gin and if that’s what you look for in your Gin then Hayman’s is certainly for you. It worked very well in a Gin & Tonic and in cocktails that were sweet and contained citrus, such as the excellent John Collins. For an alternative to these fruity cocktails, try a lovely Alexander or one of the cracking hot gin drinks.

Hayman’s London Dry Gin is bottled at 40%ABV and is available for around £16.

Hayman’s also make an Old Tom Gin, a Sloe Gin and a Gin liqueur.

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