Cocktails with… The Spiced Grouse

Following my recent tasting of some of The Famous Grouse range, DBS discovered that the company have released three “infusions” (or “infused spirit drinks”), each highlighting a particular whisky tasting note: citrus, vanilla or spice. After a brief discussion and a little bit of research, with a gentleman at the Famous Grouse Experience, we decided to try the spice version.

Bottled at 35% ABV, this is classed as an “infused spirit drink” rather than a whisky, but it is essentially The Famous Grouse whisky that has been infused with orange, cinnamon and star anise in an attempt to bring out the rich, spicy notes. In my previous reviews, I have been impressed by the company’s willingness to try out different variations and so was rather excited to try this; here are my thoughts.

On its own
Nose: Intensely sweet, with lots of orange fondant and a hint of warm, sweet spice underneath.
Taste: Savoury to start, then a substantial sweetness sets in, accompanied by a comforting warmth. Hints of cinnamon and a touch of cloves, with lots of sweet orange fondant resounding throughout. The star anise appears lightly on the finish and aftertaste. The whisky itself takes a bit of a backseat to these other strong flavours.

Old Fashioned
I was quite excited to try this one, but, when we tried a standard recipe, the cocktail was exceptionally sweet, both to start and then on the finish; there weren’t enough whisky notes to give any real weight to the drink and too many sweet, fruity ones.

DBS then adjusted the recipe by adding some extra Famous Grouse whisky. This meant that the flavour was much more savoury and had more of the wood notes needed, but I still don’t think that this is the best way to enjoy this drink.

Rob Roy
[1 part red vermouth, 2 parts The Famous Spice]
The nose of this was sweet and spicy. Unlike the Old Fashioned, however, it had a good balance of sweetness, richness of flavour and spice. The vermouth works very well with the Spice, lessening the impact of the orange without covering it up completely and allowing the cinnamon and weightier, woody notes to come through.

Alexander
This was absolutely delicious. Now, I’m not generally a fan of Alexanders, or any cocktail with containing cream, but the chocolate in this works exceptionally well alongside the orange and spice notes of The Famous Spice, whilst the cream softens a lot of its sweetness. A fabulous after-dinner drink (especially if, like me, you have a fondness for orange creams!).

Toddy
Again, the nose had a strong note of orange fondant, which worked well with the warmth. I also caught a hint of gingerbread. To taste, it was smooth and silky to start, followed by quite an intense hit of flavour: orange, allspice and cinnamon bark. The aftertaste was pleasant, with a sweet spiciness, full of notes of liquorice, anise and cinnamon. There was also a lovely, comforting warmth beyond the obvious heat of the toddy.

Long Drink (Lemon Juice & Ginger Ale)
This worked very well, indeed. The ginger both balances the sweetness from the drink and highlight the spices. The light citrus in the ale also helps to highlight the spices, whilst adding a refreshing tartness. Lovely.

In Conclusion
I am a big fan of the experimentation being undertaken by The Famous Grouse and am pleased that I’ve had the chance to try this. Given its sweetness and the strong orange and spice notes, it reminds me a lot of a whisky liqueur and, as such, I think it works better in either long drinks (it worked very well with ginger ale), or in shorter drinks with ingredients that can balance out the sweet orange notes (e.g. the vermouth in the Rob Roy).

I struggle to choose my favourite way to drink this; I liked the Alexander, with flavour of orange creams, as well as the shorter, more intense Rob Roy. I think my absolute favourite, however, was simply with ginger ale.

– Mrs. B.

The Flavoured Grouses are available from The Famous Grouse Website for around £25 for 100cl.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s